Porsche Outlaws

Ben Williams October 25, 2020 9 No Comments

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Here I’m in 1965 (abandoned ) together with my brother Pete and our 356s. Mine was a’61 Super 90 using a Bursch exhaust and Koni shocks; Pete’s was a inventory 356 Normal. He was a hungry student at Harvard Med, so those back snow tires had been all he can manage. I would love to have my older Fjord Green coupe back; I already know how I would turn it into a moderate Outlaw.

And now for something entirely different!

Hot rodding has lots of definitions — it is not just about’32 Fords using flathead V-8s. Take the early Porsche audience, for instance. If the definition of a hot pole is to take a classic vehicle, strip it down a little, upgrade the suspension and brakes and put in a hot motor, the Porsche men do this — they simply don’t call their cars hot rods.

They call them “Outlaws.”

The production of this Outlaw

The “Outlaw” term possibly originated Rod Emory, whose Los Angeles-area store assembles some of the top altered old Porsches attainable. Emory’s sexy, race-inspired Porsche 356therefore kick-started that the Porsche Outlaw fad which has spanned Southern California and spread throughout the nation. When you understand Rod’s desktop, it makes great sense. His grandfather was Neil Emory, who collaborated Clay Jensen in Valley Custom at Burbank, one of the best LA-area stores of this article -World War II era. Valley Custom technical in sectioning, a radical operation procedure that altered the form of a stock American car by clipping a 3- or 4-in. Swath of alloy from the midsection, thus decreasing the shape of the automobile whilst maintaining the vital elements of its own factory layout.

“When you’re the grandson of one of the pioneers of hot rodding and custom car building,” Emory notes, “you can’t just leave well enough alone, can you?”

Porsche hot rod guru Rod Emory built this full custom Outlaw 356 Cabriolet with a removable hardtop for rock ’n’ roll legend John Oates. It’s chopped and lowered with a 200-bhp 2.4-liter engine based on a later Porsche Type 964, Porsche 911 rear suspension, a 911 five-speed and much more. This sleek car takes “Outlaw” to lofty heights.

Porsche hot rod genius Rod Emory assembled this complete habit Outlaw 356 Cabriolet using a detachable hardtop for stone’n’ roll legend John Oates. It’s sliced and lowered with a 200-bhp 2.4-liter engine according to a later Porsche Type 964, Porsche 911 rear suspension, a 911 five-speed and a whole lot more. This glossy car takes “Outlaw” to lofty heights.

But the idea of hot rodding and customizing Porsches, having hardly any exceptions, wasn’t commonly done. Rod Emory explained he began:

“When Valley Custom closed,” Emory explained, “my grandfather, Neil Emory, went to work for Chick Iverson at VW-Porsche of Newport Beach, in 1961. And after he graduated from high school, Gary Emory, my dad, started at the dealership and became the parts manager. About 1974, Chick Iverson and my father started Porsche Parts Obsolete. Chick owned it; my dad ran it. Everything that was a couple of years old or overstocked would go back to Porsche’s distribution warehouses. They were actually destroying old, unneeded inventory, so Chip and my dad bought all of it and started Porsche Parts Obsolete in Costa Mesa.” (It’s still in business).

“Very soon, my dad was selling NOS (new old stock) Porsche parts around the world,” Rod continued. “In that the rear of his warehouse there was an area where we did a little restoration work, playing with automobiles for our personal use. So once I was in high school, my dad and I’d take older Porsches and reduced thempolish the brake drums and fool’em out a small bit.

When Rod Emory was customizing a rare ’53 Porsche coupe in the late 1980s, there was no class to display the car so he developed this little ‘Outlaw’ badge. Emory put these badges on his own cars and gave them to friends who were hot rodding their Porsches. Ever since, modified Porsches aren’t called hot rods; they’re Outlaws.

When Rod Emory was scrutinizing a rare’53 Porsche coupe from late 1980therefore, there wasn’t any course to display the car so that he developed this small ‘Outlaw’ badge. Emory place these badges on his cars and gave them to friends who had been hot rodding their own Porsches. Ever because, altered Porsches are not called hot sticks; they are Outlaws.

“Next thing that you know, I am doing a complete restoration on a’53 coupe for me personally. I place body-mounted fog lights onto it, and hood connectors. The Porsche purists were freaking out since we had been customizing a rare’53 coupe. We moved into a few occasions. There wasn’t any course to display this automobile from the late’80therefore, so we came up with this small ‘Outlaw’ badge for our deck figurines which read,”356 Outlaws.” We place those badges about the private cars which we were constructing gave this badge to buddies who were rodding out their cars.

“It started as a little private fun club, but people picked up the term, so any Porsche that’s modified now is called an Outlaw.”

There was a reason. Early Porsche 356s had only 60 bhp in “normal” type, 88 bhp at “Super” guise and 115 bhp as a “Super 90.” Even using a 2200-pounds. Coupe (Speedsters were milder ), that is not a great deal of suds. Typical Outlaw Porsches today package Porsche 912 lookup engines exhausted to 1700cc and even 1800cc with Weber carbohydrates, hot cams and twin plug heads for 150 bhp and much more. Most buffs upgrade to five-speed gearboxes. Suspension mods consist of aftermarket sports shocks, springs and sway bars. Wider brakes and contemporary radial tires are crucial, and many fans retrofit disc brakes.

Although body alterations are popular, wider rear fenders, delicate dechroming and Carrera GT mods like external gas salts and lightweight bumpers are not uncommon. Bruce Canepa is one of many restorers/builders who have taken a 911 six cube, lopped off two tanks and assembled the supreme 2-liter-plus Porsche flat-four. And several courageous supporters — for example Ken Fenical, aka POSIES, that provides custom springs into the hot rod network –‘ve fitted water-cooled Subaru horizontal fours great for a simple 200-and horsepower.

Outlaw devotees

The 911 audience has its own Porsche Outlaw devotees too. Practitioners for example Magnus Walker (Urban Outlaw), Marlon Goldberg (LA Workshop 5001) and Rob Dickinson, who based Singer Vehicle Design, will gladly build you a completely altered and restyled, air-cooled 911 that’ll apartment run off and hide from a modern version Porsches. But you will pay up to $500,000 for this liberty.

Marlon Goldberg, formerly with Singer Design, runs his own company now: LA Workshop 5001. He let me drive this killer ’73 Porsche 911 with a 3.4-liter engine and adjustable KW suspension. This baby is really quick. Its “plain Jane” exterior fools a lot of canyon carvers in the Malibu Hills. If you see an understated 911 in your mirrors, better let ’em by....

Marlon Goldberg, previously with Singer Design, conducts his own company today: LA Workshop 5001. He allow me to push this killer’73 Porsche 911 using a 3.4-liter motor and adjustable KW suspension. This infant is really fast. Its “plain Jane” outside fools a great deal of canyon carvers from the Malibu Hills. If you find an understated 911 on your mirrors, better allow Celtics by…

Want to perform it yourself? There’s an entire cadre of premier aftermarket providers including ANDIAL (racing, suspensions, engines, etc. ) — notice: Porsche purchased the ANDIAL company years back ); Nickies (high performance cylinders); Air Power Racing (high performance engines); Shasta Design (cams, crank-shafts, sticks and engine components ); and others that will sell you all that you want to hot rod your older Porsche

OK, you can argue that this transforms a wonderful old car to a Frankenstein monster, but (obviously ) I disagree. It’s no different than the “resto-mod” craze that is seen ill-handling classic muscle cars changed into quicker, safer, more dependable cruisers. The Porsche Club of America and its numerous subgroups do not frown on cars and the cars are welcome at club parties. You can locate providers in Chrstophorus, that the PCA monthly and in The Porsche 356 Registry, to mention some books. Talking with lots of Outlaw owners, they have generally started with a beater 356 or 911, which means you might argue that they are preserving cars which may otherwise have been revived. A excellent start is the publication “How to make an old Porsche Fly” by Craig Richter, in case you are able to locate a copy. It’s been out of print for many years, but it could be downloaded from the author’s site for a minimal fee.

One of their best-known Porsche Outlaw owners is Bruce Meyer, whose assortment of historical race cars, Le Mans winners, Full Classics and hot sticks is one of the finest in country.

Porsche hot rod guru Rod Emory built this full custom Outlaw 356 Cabriolet with a removable hardtop for rock ’n’ roll legend John Oates. It’s chopped and lowered with a 200-bhp 2.4-liter engine based on a later Porsche Type 964, Porsche 911 rear suspension, a 911 five-speed and much more. This sleek car takes “Outlaw” to lofty heights.

Porsche hot rod genius Rod Emory assembled this complete habit Outlaw 356 Cabriolet using a detachable hardtop for stone’n’ roll legend John Oates. It’s sliced and lowered with a 200-bhp 2.4-liter engine according to a later Porsche Type 964, Porsche 911 rear suspension, a 911 five-speed and a whole lot more. This slick car takes “Outlaw” to lofty heights.

“I’ve had my Outlaw Porsche 356 for at least 25 years,” states Bruce. “I’m sure I didn’t invent the idea, but I was certainly one of the first. I bought my little ’57 356A Coupe in a basket, unassembled, and it was red. I’d already gone through my “red car” span and believed it’d look cool as a classic silver Porsche GT. The motor is somewhat over 1800cc and grows about 125 bhp, which can be sufficient. It’s got the complete GT look group with Speedster chairs and a roll bar. I have done a dozen rallies and pushed it out Chicago into LA on Route 66…and now I’ll be pushing it on Route 66 back shortly. Since I constructed it, we have done over 20,000 trouble-free miles.

“I’ve driven Porsches since 1961,” states Bruce,”that is over 57 decades, and truth be told, it is my favorite marque. We have an Outlaw’72 911S using a 3-litre Twin Plug ANDIAL motor…it makes my’73RS feel slow!

The LA Workshop 5001 Porsche 911’s engine is a 3.4-liter flat-six equipped with a Motec M84 engine management system, twin-plug ignition, Jenvey individual throttle bodies, a GT3 oil pump, Carillo rods, CP lightweight pistons, Mahle Motorsports cylinders, Custom cams and more. It develops 304 bhp at 7300 rpm. It makes this 2300-lb. Nardo Gray coupe really fly — believe me!

The LA Workshop 5001 Porsche 911’s engine is a 3.4-liter flat-six outfitted with a Motec M84 engine management system, twin-plug ignition, Jenvey individual throttle bodies, also a GT3 petroleum pump, Carillo sticks, CP lightweight pistons, Mahle Motorsports cylinders, Custom cams and much more. It grows 304 bhp in 7300 rpm. It causes this 2300-pounds. Nardo Gray coupe really fly — believe me!

“I really like the Outlaw concept,” he adds. “It’s another fun way to enjoy the brand and much like hot rodding… you do it your way with cues inspired by Porsche’s rich racing history. With Porsche prices being what they are for the pure examples, it leaves a little on the table for the creative “Porsche-philes” to stand out and be in the match.”

So what exactly do Porsche restorers think about this?

I talked with Cam Ingram, proprietor of Road Scholars at Durham, N.C., one of the greatest Porsche restorers from the nation.

“I think the Outlaw builders make a vital contribution to the Porsche brotherhood,” Cam said. “They’ve re-stimulated interest in the early 356s. Since the dawn of time, people have been modifying Porsches, especially Speedsters. The Outlaws are just a new interpretation. I think there’s a market for it, and it’s good for the brand and the hobby to have all these young people re-engaged. The collector car hobby is expensive and this allows a way for guys to get involved at a different price point.”

Cam’s Dad, Bob Ingram, possessed one of Magnus Walker’s “Urban Outlaw” altered 911s. The Ingrams were amazed Magnus had come to the United States with hardly any money or chance, then altered 911s for himself and turned into a popular success.

“I’ve had my Outlaw Porsche 356 for at least 25 years,’ says Bruce Meyer. “I’m sure I didn’t invent the idea, but I was certainly one of the first. I bought my little ’57 356A Coupe in a basket, unassembled... I thought it would look cool as an old silver Porsche GT. The engine is a bit over 1800cc and develops about 125 bhp, which is enough.”

“I’ve had my Outlaw Porsche 356 for at least 25 years,’ says Bruce Meyer. “I’m sure I didn’t invent the idea, but I was certainly one of the first. I bought my little ’57 356A Coupe in a basket, unassembled… I thought it would look cool as an old silver Porsche GT. The engine is a bit over 1800cc and develops about 125 bhp, which is enough.”

“My father was interested in buying something that had become a cultural artifact,” Cam claims. “We enjoyed owning it, but then we sold it. It became so recognizable my father literally couldn’t drive the car around, because of all the public attention it drew.”

I had to inquire Cam if he would construct an Outlaw for a customer. “We’ve had that (request) happen,” he explained. “But we are really passionate as a company in authentically restoring these cars. It’s a niche market; we’re good at it, and it’s what drives me, to make sure that we’re preserving the cars the way the company actually produced them. There are many guys who do those (Outlaws), Rod Emory being the top guy — but we’re well-known for authentic restorations. Rod works on some cars that would never have been saved. I applaud him. We don’t get to do the super-sexy stuff. We do everything to factory specs.”

On a personal opinion, I purchased a used Porsche 1961 356 S90 coupe shortly after I completed graduate school. Of route it had an aftermarket (and loudly ) Bursch exhaust and that I upgraded the shocks, but it was not an Outlaw — we did not have that phrase from the early’60s. I continue searching for this vehicle, or even one like that. Of course I would need to upgrade the drums to disks and likely match a hotter cam and Weber carbohydrates. I’m still a hot rodder, therefore the Porsche Outlaw mindset suits me to a T, and it appears to attract a good deal of other people, too. 

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