Car of Those Week:1934 Ford three-window coupe

Ben Williams February 24, 2020 23 No Comments

Car of the Week:1934 Ford three-window coupe

Story and photos with Bob Tomaine

Sitting to a 1934 Ford coupe because 1958

Car of the Week1934 Ford three window coupe - <p>Car of Those Week:1934 Ford three-window coupe

This Ford has invested no longer than 22 years of its lifetime on the road, and the number may be much lower.

 

Driving a 1934 Ford three-window coupe in an AACA Hershey flea market area to the show area will be remarkable if not to one detail.

“We took the shortcut way to get over to the show field,” stated the Ford’s proprietor, Don Weir of York, Pa. , “so it’s probably about a mile altogether, other than backing it in and out of the barn.”

The part concerning the barn makes all of the difference, however, since the car had been around for a longlong moment.

“We bought it in Binghamton, New York, in 1956,” Weir clarified. “A friend of mine purchased it ’56 and that I moved New York together with him and assisted him take back it Philadelphia. In’58, I purchased it .

1582555465 892 Car of the Week1934 Ford three window coupe - <p>Car of Those Week:1934 Ford three-window coupe

With a straight face, Ford managed to assert its V-8 was the very first from the lowest-price area, therefore touting it at the grille badge made perfect sense.

 

“It’s been sitting in my barn since 1958 until we pulled it out on August 3 of (2019).”

The friend who had purchased it Binghamton, he stated, was a critical lover of such Fords and understandably so.

Building that a ‘better’ Ford

Ford by 1934 had set its too-long reliance on the Model T . While that the Model T that had been introduced in late 1908 had done more than any modern car to produce private transport a reality for hundreds of Americans, it failed to evolve in addition to the entire world it had helped to make. Its creation ended in 1927 and regardless of how it had been continuously upgraded and enhanced during its life, it stayed a car designed with 1908’s requirements in mind.

The Model T was treasured then as it’s now, but it had been embarrassingly obsolete and thus that the Model A that came for 1928 was considerably more contemporary. Its predecessor’s planetary-gear two-speed manual transmission and the service brake that acted on the transmission had been gone, replaced with what had become the industry standard: a three-speed guide sliding-gear transmission and brakes on all four wheels. The closing Model Ts had worn styling upgrades that aided them to seem present, if not new, but the Model A’s styling has been modern and appealing. Its 200-cid flathead four created 40 hp and while this has been a respectable improvement from the Model T 176.7-cid four using its own 20 hp, it was a four.

The four-cylinder Chevrolet outsold Ford at the 1927 version year for the very first time, no doubt in part as Ford closed down to retool for a lot of the year. Then Chevy switched to a six to 1929. The lowest Chevys that season will be the six-cylinder $525 roadster and vacationing while the least-expensive Ford was the four-cylinder $450 roadster. Chevrolet advertised it currently offered “a six in the price range of a four” and though Ford was not the sole four-cylinder automobile then available on the current market, the purpose was made. In case anyone did not get it, the ad noted that “Chevrolet engineers knew that the six-cylinder motor is inherently the more perfectly balanced motor — the ideal power plant to meet the growing public demand for greater reserve power, faster getaway and, above all — smooth, quiet performance.”

1582555465 559 Car of the Week1934 Ford three window coupe - <p>Car of Those Week:1934 Ford three-window coupe

The 1934 Ford’s instrument panel is about as straightforward as you can. The painted surface was fresh for 1934.

 

Ford’s answer came in 1932 together with the V-8. The new automobile was an evolutionary step from the Model A thanks to an overall softening of the lines and has been “the greatest thrill in motoring” thanks to the engine. The 221-cid flathead V-8 developed 65 hp and Ford claimed the driver would detect the “flashing acceleration, the ease with which (the car) will reach its maximum speed, and hold it.” The brand new 221, it clarified, “for the first time brings into the lowest price field the V-8 type of engine, which has previously been confined almost exclusively to cars selling in the highest price range.” In a shot Chevrolet’s claim of “smooth, quiet performance” from its own “more perfectly balanced motor,” Ford added which “one of the important characteristics of the V-type engine is its smooth operation.”

While Ford’s oldest V-8s weren’t without troubles, Ford functioned to fix them and shortly had a winner. Its descendants would maintain manufacturing 2 decades later, but immediately, the V-8 for 1933 was bumped up to 75 hp in bodies which “are new and distinctive in their graceful streamlines and they express the new mode in motor car designing. In every detail, you see evidence of a carefully planned harmony of line, proportion and direction.” It was puffery, since the brand new Ford replaced much of those 1932 version’s boxy vertical motif with a gently weathered appearance. The softening that had emerged one year before was improved along with the 1933 Ford represented an almost-complete fracture with the fashions of preceding Fords.

Not surprisingly, even though the V-8 was fostered to 85 hp for 1934, the Ford’s body was just mildly upgraded with adjustments such as a slightly different grille, reconfigured hood-side louvers and more compact headlamps along with cowl lamps. It has been “the ideal choice for all the people, everywhere” and “the complete answer to your motoring needs.” There could have been a fact in that quite broad claim, since like most prewar Fords, that the 1933 and’34 became popular with collectors (and hot rodders) long past. Clearly, Weir’s buddy was one of those that fell under the spell.

1582555465 70 Car of the Week1934 Ford three window coupe - <p>Car of Those Week:1934 Ford three-window coupe

Ford was proud of its own brand new 221-cid V-8 in 1932 and mentioned its own “flashing acceleration.” By 1934, it had jumped out of the first 65 hp into 85.

 

The initial drive…61 years later

“At one point,” Weir recalled, “he had four three-window coupes in his barn and two five-window coupes. He just liked to buy Fords and he had a place to store them. There were three of us who all ran around together and we all played around with cars, but he had the most money, so he bought them first.”

His buddy with the storage area may not have pushed the car revealed here also it is likely that he never heard it operate, Weir stated, adding that if he purchased the Ford from him 1958, he had been convinced he would not wind up in an identical circumstance.

“My original plan was to restore it,” he clarified, “but then I got married in ’63 and, of course, when that happens, a lot of plans are changed… This got put in the back of the barn and as you buy other cars, they go in front of the one that’s in the back of the barn and so you can’t get to it.”

Only a couple of friends knew he had it, therefore there was no flow of questions regarding it and the car may have remained in the rear of the barn or even for Weir’s second strategy to its Ford. This time, the strategy would be to let it all go.

“I know that nothing happens overnight,” Weir stated, “so I figure it’s time to get started and move some stuff. Fortunately for somebody else, unfortunately for me, this was the one we pulled out first.”

He will not be disappointed if this strategy falls through just like his initial strategy . Should which occur, there is really a third strategy.

“I would think that it’s probably about as good as it looks,” he explained. “It’s not perfect. It’s going to need some loving care, but if I kept it, it would stay the way it is. I think it’s a good preservation car, it’s a good survivor and it’s a good reference car for anybody who’s trying to restore one and wants to know what’s right and what’s wrong, so I would keep it the way it is.”

The automobile could actually be better as it seems, he pulled it from the barn on a Saturday and had it operating by noon on Sunday. Swapping outside the gasoline tank to get one from the other Ford was that the sole significant job and after that, it was ready. It went off of the trailer and from the Hershey flea market to the series area. It was the very first time at the 61 years because he had purchased it Weir managed to push it on a road.

“That’s why it would be really nice to keep it,” he explained, “but I’ve got three cars torn apart in the shop right now.”

The gap between three disassembled automobiles and four may not appear to be a significant one.

“Well, that’s true,” Weir conceded. “That’s true until you start mixing up the parts.”


1582555465 337 Car of the Week1934 Ford three window coupe - <p>Car of Those Week:1934 Ford three-window coupe

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